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Betteridge’s law of headlines is an adage that states: “Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no.”

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if the publishers were confident that the answer was yes, they would have presented it as an assertion; by presenting it as a question, they are not accountable for whether it is correct or not

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A headline with a question mark at the end means, in the vast majority of cases, that the story is tendentious or over-sold. It is often a scare story, or an attempt to elevate some run-of-the-mill piece of reporting into a national controversy and, preferably, a national panic.


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  • article title: “Betteridge’s law of headlines” date: 2023-09-04 lastmod: 2023-09-04

📇 Index

Highlights

Highlight ( 🔗)

Betteridge’s law of headlines is an adage that states: “Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no.”

Highlight ( 🔗)

if the publishers were confident that the answer was yes, they would have presented it as an assertion; by presenting it as a question, they are not accountable for whether it is correct or not

Highlight ( 🔗)

A headline with a question mark at the end means, in the vast majority of cases, that the story is tendentious or over-sold. It is often a scare story, or an attempt to elevate some run-of-the-mill piece of reporting into a national controversy and, preferably, a national panic.